Engaging in the “White on White Conversation” on Racism and Hate ~ The Choice ~  The Willingness ~ The  Readiness ~ The Work

Engaging in the “White on White Conversation” on Racism and Hate ~ The Choice ~ The Willingness ~ The Readiness ~ The Work

Why the hesitation by white people to engage with white people in difficult and uncomfortable discourse on racism and hate?
Some would argue that the reasons are due to the “teflon effect”, “cognitive dissonance”, “white fragility”, “fear” and a lack of knowledge.
“White on White” conversations can become contentious, uncomfortable and question social-cultural loyalties.
But we are in the 21st century and “White on White” conversations are taking place by choice, with emotional intelligence and moral courage.
Inclusive generational alliances are in motion and a reality.

Discourse with Mutual Respect, Dignity and Integrity ~ Humanizing Norms When Discussing Diversity

Discourse with Mutual Respect, Dignity and Integrity ~ Humanizing Norms When Discussing Diversity

“When you want wisdom and insight as badly as you want to breathe, it is then you shall have it. There is no greater evil one can suffer than to hate reasonable discourse. To express oneself badly is not only faulty as far as the language goes but does some harm to the soul.”
Attributed to Socratic Philosophy

Thinking Critically ~ Brain-Based Learning and Teaching

Thinking Critically ~ Brain-Based Learning and Teaching

As educators, we often share with parents that we don’t only teach content, but we teach young minds.
While being well intended, the comment is vague. What is not mentioned is that what we are really talking about is the complexities of our brain and how it learns. Ultimately, our goal is to provide each brain with pathways and maps by which to navigate knowledge, to decipher it critically and fall in love with the voyage.

Ethnographic Citizenry ~ Able to Observe Diversity and Embrace It

Ethnographic Citizenry ~ Able to Observe Diversity and Embrace It

The Zulu greeting of “Sawubona” means “I see you.”
These are more than words of politeness.
Sawubona carries the importance of recognizing the worth and dignity of each person.
It says, “I see the whole of you—your experiences, your passions, your pain, your strengths and weaknesses, and your future. You are valuable to me.”
Sawubona is also infused with the belief that when others “see” me, then I exist.
The common response is “Shiboka”, which means “I exist for you”.
These are more than greetings.
Awareness and observation go far beyond looking and seeing – a matter of validating presence.

Deconstructing the Golden Rule ~ Treat Others as They Wish to be Treated

Deconstructing the Golden Rule ~ Treat Others as They Wish to be Treated

“Do unto others . . . ” you know the rest.
It was always preached – right?!
So easy to say – maybe too easy, and for a reason.
Is it all about “me, myself and I” with casually mentioning the “others”?
How about –
“Do unto others as they wish to have done unto them.”
Let’s see which one passes the test of recognition, authenticity and validation . . . in the 21st Century.