Worth Rereading and Remembering ~ “Tú Me Quieres Blanca” ~ (You Who Want Me White) (Spanish Original followed by English Translation)

Worth Rereading and Remembering ~ “Tú Me Quieres Blanca” ~ (You Who Want Me White) (Spanish Original followed by English Translation)

Alfonsina Storni wrote during a time of emerging “strong men” and authoritarianism. Among such forces and often standing alone among her peers, she had the courage to oppose machoism, chauvinism and the double standards suppressed on women. “Tú Me Quieres Blanca” (“You Who Want Me White”) reminds of the connections and intersectionalities of Diversity – then and now.

What It Means to be White ~ Inclusive Programming Part II of II

What It Means to be White ~ Inclusive Programming Part II of II

It wasn’t until recently that I became fully aware of the scope of disparity in race and gender that encompasses the music composition world.
I’m now in my fifth year of teaching high school band and, up to this point, it was never really something I had considered. I would go online, to Everyone’s Favorite Music Distributor & Son, Inc.*, and peruse their lists – listening to recordings of titles that I found interesting (because, let’s be honest, we all judge a book by its cover when we’re limited on time). I used to think: “Wow, if I ever get into writing music, I should always title my piece ‘Aardvark Adventures’, or ‘Aaron’s Lofty Dreams’ so that I can make sure my titles are on the first page.” Adam Collins

Life and Literacy ~ Poetry and the Whole Person

Life and Literacy ~ Poetry and the Whole Person

This past year, All Saints Literacy Center piloted a supplemental program called  “Whole Person Literacy” focused on spiritual and cultural literacy based on concepts of knowing, understanding, and self-development. We had monthly activities that were carried out in pairs or in groups. Learners and tutors participating in the program gained knowledge and created meaning individually and socially as they took part in the activities. The needs of the whole person were explored through an alternative lens of literacy.

Voices of Columbine: Echoes from Inside the Tragedy – Part I of II

Voices of Columbine: Echoes from Inside the Tragedy – Part I of II

“How could this be happening in this safe, comfortable middle-class neighborhood, in a high school noted for academic excellence; where arts, music, and theater were prized; where parent involvement was without equal, and graduation rates were among the highest in the state. It was simply inconceivable, and yet it had happened . . . here, at Columbine.” Carolyn Lundsford Mears

Voices of Columbine: Excerpts from the “Columbine Mosaic” – Part II of II

Voices of Columbine: Excerpts from the “Columbine Mosaic” – Part II of II

The complete Columbine narratives are included in Experiences of Columbine Parents: Finding a Way to Tomorrow (available through ProQuest UMI AAT 3161558). Detailed explanation of my approach to research may be found in my text Interviewing for Education and Social Science Research: The Gateway Approach published by Palgrave Macmillan (2009, 2015).
I have made available stories of experiences of educators involved in mass violence events, including shootings, natural disaster, and terrorist attack, in my book Reclaiming School in the Aftermath of Trauma published by Palgrave-Macmillan (2012).

The rhythm is gonna get ya!

The rhythm is gonna get ya!

Ah… Sweet, sweet 🎶 We play it, fill our ears with it, go to sleep and wake up to it, a cappella to it, whistle to it, hum to it, dance to it, do back flips on ice and mats to it, attend standing-room-only concerts to it, Alleluia and Amen to it, protest and march to it, doo wop to it, Motown to it, rap to it, lull babies to sleep to it, provide a lady’s/gentleman’s choice to it, snowball to it, hokey pokey to it, scream it out loud (off key) in the car to it, shower to it, horses and riders dance Freestyle to it.
Maybe one day we learn to harmonize with each other to it.

Concert of Colors

Concert of Colors

MUSIC – perhaps the best way to appreciate its significance is to think of it as being nonexistent or unavailable.
What would our lives be without music? What would our emotional diaries – read like – feel like?

Thank goodness MUSIC lives reminding us of our diversity, inclusivity and humanity.

The Concert of Color is all about that universal harmony.
Check it out and be there.
The summer schedule will soon be available but the 2022 program provides insights as to its annual depth and breadth.